Tyson Gay and Asafa Powell doping positive

gay dan powell

U.S. sprinter Tyson Gay and former 100-meter record holder Jamaican Asafa Powell failed the doping test.
Gay, 30, who became one of the fastest sprinters in the 100 meters, by the U.S. anti-doping agency tested positive for doping in a competition last May.
While Powell tested positive for the banned stimulant substances while participating in the Jamaican national championships, last June.
Jamaican sprinter Sherone Simpson also failed in the same doping test.
This is the latest doping scandal in athletics arena once a month ago the Jamaican Olympic champion Veronica Campbell-Brown also tested positive for doping type diuretic.
Powell had held the record before it was broken Usain Bolt 100m in 2008. And to this day he is still ranked as the fourth fastest sprinter in the world.
Powell helped Jamaica won the 400m relay gold medals at the 2008 Beijing Olympics.
This year he recorded a record of 9.88 seconds but failed to make the Jamaican team that will compete at the World Championships next month.
‘Thank punishment’
“I want to explain to family, friends and the main thing is my supporters all over the world that I have never knowingly or intentionally use supplements or drugs in violation of the rules,” Powell said in a statement responses.
“I never cheated or even,” belanya.
As for Tyson Gay, doping verdict is a blow for him because in 2013 he actually recorded the fastest time despite missing three times in 2011 and the full year following a hip operation.
Tyson Gay is still waiting for the results of the B sample urine tests.
However he has claimed back from the World Championships next month in Moscow.
“I do not have a story of sabotage … I basically trust someone and it’s disappointing,” he said.
“I know what happened, but I can not discuss at this time.”
“I hope to be back running, but I will accept whatever punishment is fitting a man.”

Though cleared, Redskins will go easy with RG3

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Robert Griffin III put on his knee brace and passed the perfunctory Washington Redskins conditioning test on the eve of training camp, then declared he has ”nothing left to prove” – at least physically – in his return from major knee surgery.

That’s doesn’t mean he’s all the way back.

Griffin said Wednesday he won’t participate in 11-on-11 drills in the early days of camp and likely won’t play in any preseason games. The quarterback who likes to keep the throttle wide open is going to have to exercise a bit more patience as he and coach Mike Shanahan – who have shared blame for how Griffin got hurt – try to work together to get him on the field for the regular season opener Sept. 9.

”They want to make sure we’re not doing anything too soon that we don’t have to do,” Griffin said. ”Let some of these other guys get ready for the preseason. If it comes around that I’m ready to go, then maybe in the third preseason game, but as far as my understanding goes, preseason’s really not even in the air. … I think Coach feels like I can play without any preseason, so there no need really for that. Patience is the key.”

Griffin had reconstructive surgery on two ligaments in January after injuring his right knee multiple times in a playoff loss to the Seattle Seahawks. Team doctors and coaches cleared him for practice within the last week, setting a remarkable pace for a rehab that can typically take a year or more.

”In my mind there’s nothing left to prove,” Griffin said. ”And that’s the way you have to approach the game when you’re coming off of an injury. If you pass the test, then in your mind, you feel like you’re ready to go.”

But Shanahan is determined to play it safe with his franchise quarterback, having said he wants to make sure Griffin is 100 percent before playing in a game. Shanahan will meet with reporters Thursday, but Griffin appeared to lay out the key points in the latest important conversation between player and coach.

”I think we’re on the same page,” Griffin said. ”When we sat down and talked about what I was going to do in training camp and the weeks to follow, it was a good moment for me because of all the hard work had paid off. And they’re going to allow me to get back out there and do what I do, and that’s play football and just have fun with the guys.

”We all made mistakes last season. We all understand that. We all talked about it, and it’s time to move on. … Me and Mike Shanahan‘s relationship is paramount to this team being successful.”

Shanahan was not only criticized for leaving Griffin in the Seahawks game too long, but there was also scrutiny over whether the Redskins’ offense – along with Griffin’s aggressiveness – left him too vulnerable. He led the team to its first division title in 13 years, but he missed all or parts of four games with various injuries.

”The goal is longevity in the league. You also want to win,” Griffin said. ”And so, as a quarterback, I don’t like to conform and say you can’t win outside the pocket. I think you can win outside the pocket. You’ve just to be smart about it. And that’s what I’ve learned over the past six months about myself and what we need to do to win. Maybe that’s keeping me in the pocket a little bit more. Maybe that’s throwing the ball away a little bit more.”

Griffin said he’s been an ”overachiever” his whole life, so the thought of being eased back into the practice routine and skipping the preseason isn’t part of his nature.

”If they want to me to patient right now and ramp it up later, then I’m willing to do that,” he said. ”And they know that I’m going to be – I wouldn’t say compliant – but I’m going to follow those rules, follow those guidelines, do as much as I can within that, and when it’s time to go full-go, then I’ll be ready to go.”

”If you talk to a lot of the vets, they don’t like the preseason,” he added. ”That’s a well-known fact. Even I know that – and I’ve been the league only one year.”

Waiting for “coolest pair” in Formula One

Rumor attraction of Red Bull withdraw from Lotus Kimi Raikkonen continues to grow. The Iceman combination with Sebastian Vettel assessed will be very cool for the world racing pole.

Raikkonen comeback this season acted pretty incredible. Despite a long absence, the Finnish driver is able to penetrate the top three standings F1 Vettel and become a competitor as well as his former team, Ferrari.

It made Raikkonen into one of three candidates who will replace Mark Webber, who decided to retire at the end of the season. Kimi stay competitive with Toro Tosso duo, Daniel Ricciardo and Jean-Eric Vergne.

However, McLaren’s Lewis Hamilton-Raikkonen Vettel assess the combination is the most interesting. Because, Raikkonen could be assessed a new rival for the defending champion.

“Today will be a very cool look at Kimi in Red Bull. He would complicate Seb (Vettel),” said Hamilton in the British newspaper, The Sun.

“Kimi is a superb rider, everyone knows it. So it will be very interesting what he would do with a better car,” added the champion of the 2008 F1 season.

Lotus Party is still reluctant to release their hero is. Raikkonen himself insists there is no agreement whatsoever on the future. “If I know (about the future) will definitely be my responsibility to stop these nonsense rumors,” said Kimi.

Raikkonen started his career in 2001 with Sauber defending. After that, he moved to McLaren a year later before solidifying Ferrari in 2007.

33-year-old man had quit F1 in 2009 and performed at the rally event World Rally Championship (WRC) and Nascar. In 2012, the 2007 F1 champion eventually back to racing pole.

Ten greatest athletes in Kansas City sports history

While the history of sports in Kansas City is largely tied to the Chiefs (NFL) and the Royals (MLB), the narration is threaded much deeper than the names on the front of the jerseys. The “team first” mantra will always ring true, however, there are some athletes that are Considered the anchors for their colleagues, Organizations, cities and even generations.
Though not as vast as some of the bigger cities of the – oftentimes resulting in an astronomical popularity – Kansas City has seen some of the best call it home.

Here are the 10 most beloved athletes of professional sports in Kansas City history.
Who sits atop this list for you?
* List is in alphabetical order
* List includes only athletes; no coaches or owners INVOLVED
Nate “Tiny” Archibald (Kings, 1972-76)
His nickname may be “Tiny,” but he had a big game. With the Kings / Omaha Kings, Archibald enjoyed some of his best years in the NBA.

In the 1972-73 season, his first year with the Kings, the point guard averaged 34 points and 11.4 assists per game – leading the league in both categories. In fact, Archibald Became one of the rare players to lead the NBA in both assists and points in one season.
With the Kings, Archibald was a three-time All-Star, and he was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 1991.

George Brett (Royals, 1973-93)

The unequivocal leader of the Royals during their glory days of the 1970s and 1980s, Brett’s name is synonymous with Kansas City sports – even leading the team to its lone World Series title over cross-state rival, the St.. Louis Cardinals, in 1985.
Having played his entire career with the Royals, the Hall-of-Fame third baseman is also the franchise leader in most major statistical categories.

Brett stayed in the Kansas City area following his playing days and has always been closely tied to the organization. He was named the team’s interim hitting coach Earlier this season.

Len Dawson (Chiefs, 1963-75)

Not originally a member of the Chiefs, Dawson’s career did not really get going until joining the Dallas Texans five years into his professional football days. The franchise moved to Kansas City one year later, and the rest is history.
Dawson led the Chiefs to two Super Bowl appearances, losing the very first one to the Green Bay Packers and winning the franchise’s lone Super Bowl title three years later against the Minnesota Vikings. He was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1987.
His close connection to the organization and the city after his player career keeps Dawson’s name among Kansas City’s elite.

Tony Gonzalez (Chiefs, 1997-2008)

Though Gonzalez is now a member of the Atlanta Falcons, he will be best remembered for his days donning Chiefs’ red at Arrowhead Stadium – at least in the eyes of Kansas Citians.
Gonzalez has made the best-tight-end-ever argument an open-and-shut case, having tallied 1,242 receptions for 14.268 yards and 103 touchdowns – all records for his position. These numbers, however, make it imperative to include his name among the greatest pass-Catchers of all time, Regardless of position. The 16-year veteran ranks second in catches, seventh in receiving yards and sixth in touchdown receptions in NFL history.
Even though he did not get a postseason victory until joining the Falcons, Gonzalez will forever be a part of the Chiefs’ family.

Maurice Greene, the Olympians (Track and Field)

Born and raised in the Kansas City area, Greene took the entire world by storm by being Anointed the world’s fastest man back in 1999. The speedster would go on to take gold in both the 100m and 4x100m relay at the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney, Australia.
Greene’s stretch of dominance from 1997-2001 is one that will not soon be forgotten. He has been an avid participant at the Kansas Relays and is now a track and field coach at UCLA.

Bo Jackson (Royals, 1986-90)

Bo Jackson hit 109 HRs in four-plus seasons with the Royals. (USA Today Sports)
Though it may have seemed like a flash in the pan, it is debatable that no other Kansas City athlete’s Stardom and fame shined brighter than that of Jackson’s.
One of the greatest pure athletes that we will ever see, Jackson’s football career with the Los Angeles Raiders was cut all too short after he sustained a freak hip injury in a game against the Cincinnati Bengals in January of 1991. He would never be the same either on the baseball field.

An example of just how well he is Regarded in Kansas City was during MLB’s 2012 All-Star Game festivities. Jackson was the coach of the American League celebrity softball squad that also featured Brett, among other greats and big names in the world of pop culture; but it was Bo who stole the show.

It was late in the game with his team way down on the scoreboard when the fans started chanting his name relentlessly. They wanted Bo to take one final at bat in Kansas City as if to signify what they had missed out on over a decade before.
It was supposed to be Joe Carter’s turn at the plate – who also has ties to the Kansas City area – but he INSISTED that Bo do the honors. It was the most breathtaking infield pop-out that the game has ever seen.

Buck O’Neil (Monarchs, 1938-43, 46-48)

O’Neil on coming to Kansas City: “I knew I was coming to the Heart of America … I did not know I was coming to the center of the universe!”
“O’Neil loved Kansas City and Kansas City loved him back. You’d be hard-pressed to find any one individual who did more to raise the profile of our great city and he did so unassumingly and selflessly. The barbecue baron, Ollie Gates, has Often said that the two most important people in Kansas City history were H. Roe Bartle and John ‘Buck’ O’Neil.: I could not agree more! ” – Bob Kendrick, President of the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum in Kansas City’s historic 18th and Vine District.

Derrick Thomas (Chiefs, 1989-99)

Though his time with the Chiefs and on this Earth were abruptly cut short back in the winter of 2000 after a tragic car accident, Thomas will certainly never be forgotten for what he meant to this organization and to this city.
On the field, the nine-time Pro-Bowler was one of the most feared pass rushers the game has ever seen – tallying 126 1/2 career sacks and an NFL-record seven sacks in one game against the Seattle Seahawks during the 1990 season. Off the field, Thomas planted himself in the Kansas City community early in his career by starting the Third and Long Foundation.
The Chiefs organization has since named its player of the year award after Thomas and a charter school opened in his name (Derrick Thomas Academy) in 2002.

Tom Watson, Professional Golfer

Born in Kansas City, Watson paved a career during the 1970s and 1980s that saw him Become one of the greatest golfers of all time. He won eight Majors from 1975-1983, Including the British Open five times.
Watson has tacked on another six Major tournament on the Champions Tour Victories.
While his hometown is not Regularly featured on the Tour, Watson’s name is peppered all over the golfing community in Kansas City – Including his involvement in designing the new Loch Lloyd Country Club and also The National Golf Club of Kansas City, located on Route 45 , or better known as Tom Watson Parkway.

Frank White (Royals, 1973-90)

One of only four jersey numbers retired by the Royals (Brett, Dick Howser and, of course, Jackie Robinson), White played his entire 18-year baseball career in Kansas City.
Though born in Mississippi, White’s story really Began in Missouri.
In 1970, then owner Ewing Kauffman started the Royals Baseball Academy Essentially which was designed to develop inner-city athletes into baseball players. White spent 18 months in the program before being signed to one of the organization’s minor league affiliates.
White played by Brett’s side during the Royals’ glory days, winning one World Series title (1985), an ALCS MVP (1980), a Silver Slugger Award (1986), eight Gold Gloves, and was named to five All-Star teams. The slick-fielding second baseman has stayed close to the game, most recently as a coach for the Kansas City T-Bones who play in the American Association of Independent Professional Baseball.