Sean Should Satisfied Finish 15th at Norisring Germany

Sean Harus Puas Finish ke-15 di Norisring Jerman

Although they had to settle for finishing in 15th position, the young Indonesian driver, Sean Gelael successfully demonstrated one of his best performances as a rookie on a street circuit, Norisring – Germany. Sean is now 16 years-old, and is the youngest driver in the FIA ​​Formula 3 European, managed to achieve the best results, ie the position 15 of the 28 riders in the third race.
In the second race, Sean finished in the top 20, while in the first race, Sean had an accident and was not able to finish the race.
At the time of the qualifying session race 1, Sean managed to record real time odds just 0.678 seconds ahead of the first order that Felix Rosenqvist. When racing himself, Sean competing with the Australian, Mitchell Gilbert, and drivers from New Zealand, Nick Cassidy.

Naas happens when Sean Mitchel collided with Gilbert. ?? I try to avoid Mitchel who was in front of me, I braked, but the wheels locked vehicle, and the vehicle can not be controlled, so I can not avoid Mitchel,?? Sean bright.
But the accident, Sean did not affect performance in the second race. ?? Consequences of a collision in the first race, the race 10-15 in the second round, I was very careful. As a result, of the 23 positions at the start, I was passed by a few riders behind me. After that, I returned to find my own rhythm, and managed to pass a few riders in front of me?? Sean said.

?? Race at Norisring circuit is quite remarkable. Each rider must always drove like crazy at every opportunity. We must put the vehicle as close as possible to the wall to be able to increase the speed, and it is actually very difficult, especially for the novice driver like me,?? he said again.
In the third race, Sean drove smoothly, even able to avoid some of the accidents that occurred in front of him, so managed to finish in 15th position. Starting from position 22, Sean managed to start well. But in the first corner, where there is often an accident, Sean chose to play it safe by taking the middle path. Nevertheless, the Swiss rider, Sandro Zeller had crashed into the rear tire Sean vehicle, which resulted in the distance with the vehicle in front of Sean being widened.

?? Due to the wide range, I think I should try harder to follow the drivers in front of me. At first I tried to increase the speed as much as possible during the first two rounds, but in the end I realized I’d better finish consistently to achieve, and maintain my position,?? she said.
After Norisring, Sean will continue the race in Spa Francorchamps circuit, Belgium, which is the second round of the British Formula 3 Championship. In the first round of the British Formula 3, Sean appeared incredible, successfully climbed the podium twice at Silverstone UK. Racing in Belgium will take place June 25 through July 27, 2013.

?? Momentum of the last few games will be my lunch in Spa Belgium. From the results I got, I believe that I was able to begin to catch up and compete in the top middle of the race. And I am also glad, that races later in the year, will be carried out in the circuits that I know enough, like Hockenheim and Zandvoort. It will be very helpful to me,?? he hoped.

Austin Dillon wins at Eldora in first NASCAR dirt race in 43 years

The Camping World Truck Series’ debut on dirt went from novelty to mainstay in the span of three hours Wednesday night at Eldora Speedway, as Austin Dillon scored the first NASCAR national series win on a dirt track in 43 years.

If you watched and weren’t entertained, I don’t know what to tell you.

“This is real racing right here, this is all I’ve got to say,” Dillon said in victory lane after beating Kyle Larson to the finish line in a green-white-checker sprint.

The thing is, that wasn’t just the joy in Dillon coming out after he reached victory lane. The excitement of being at Tony Stewart’s track was palpable and authentic. Drivers and team members exclaimed throughout the evening about the race, and heck, not even a discouraging word was said by the NASCAR social media chamber, a notoriously finicky segment.

A big reason for that excitement? The racing.

Yes, it was different. But it wasn’t just the difference in styles in how a driver attacks a half-mile dirt track versus a 1.5 mile asphalt track that made Wednesday night mesmerizing. It was multiple grooves, the throttle management and a genuine sense that the race was ultimately going to be decided by the drivers and their trucks, not by clean air. (Which can be a bit of an oxymoron at a dirt track anyway.) Throw in a big helping of nostalgia — many NASCAR drivers grew up racing local dirt tracks — and it’s hard not to consider the night a rousing success.

Need proof of how that all came together? Look no further than the battle between Norm Benningand Clay Greenfield in the Last Chance Qualifier race to get into the 150 lap main event. Instead of relying only on single truck qualifying to set the field for the race, NASCAR used heat races and a subsequent last-chance race to whittle the 35 trucks attempting the race to the 30 trucks that would start the race.

With two laps left in the Last Chance race, Benning was holding onto the final transfer spot into the main race in fifth place. Greenfield was right behind him, both drivers in trucks they own and prepare themselves, a far cry from the multi-million dollar operations in the Sprint Cup Series.

Greenfield leaned on Benning’s bumper as the two approached the white flag. Benning got loose, but stayed in the throttle and held the position. As they came through turns three and four again,Greenfield got to the inside of Benning and slid up into him, forcing Benning’s truck into the wall. Sparks flew, but Benning stayed in the gas once again, nipping Greenfield at the line for that last place starting position.

And when Benning got back to the garage? Members from seemingly every team were waiting for him to get out of his truck to congratulate him.

Did NASCAR take a gamble by staging a type of race not run for nearly half a century at an 18,000 seat facility owned by a Sprint Cup Series champion? Probably. Did it pay off? Absolutely. Instead of the question being “Does the Truck Series return next year?” it’s now “When can the Nationwide and Cup Series do this?”